COVID-19 cases increase 182% over the last month


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Coronavirus cases are continuing to rise across the country as officials say the number of new infections being reported every day is 'deeply concerning.'

On Sunday, the U.S. recorded 36,692 cases of COVID-19 with a seven-day rolling average of 147,289, which is a 182 percent increase from the 52,116 average reported four weeks ago. 

It also is the highest figure seen since January 30, when the average sat at 150,960, according to a DailyMail.com analysis of Johns Hopkins data. 

Deaths are also on the rise with 200 virus-related fatalities recorded on Sunday and a seven-day rolling average of 1,037 - the second day in a row the average has surpassed four figures.  

This marks a 269 percent increase from the average of 281 reported four weeks prior and the highest number reported since March 24.    

On Sunday, U.S. Surgeon General Dr Vivek Murthy said he was worried about the spikes seen across the nation and said it was being driven by the Indian 'Delta' variant, which accounts for almost all new cases.

'The numbers are deeply concerning,' he told Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace

'We have seen data-driven by the Delta variant cases surge over the last several weeks. And how high could they go? It's an open question.'

However, Murthy insisted COVID-19 vaccines are working because the majority of people ending up in hospitals are those who are unvaccinated.

The U.S. recorded 36,692 new cases of COVID-19 with a seven-day rolling average of 147,289, which is a 182% increase from the 52,116 average one month ago ad the highest figure seen since January 30

Deaths also rose with 200 recorded on Sunday and a seven-day rolling average of 1,037, a 269% increase from the average of 281 reported four weeks prior and the highest number reported since March 24

U.S. Surgeon General Dr Vivek Murthy called the spike in new cases 'deeply concerning' and said the surge is being driven by the Indian 'Delta' variant during an interview on Fox News Sunday (above) 

'I...think there are a couple of things buried in the data which are very important to recognize,' Murthy told Fox News Sunday.

'Number one is that the vast majority of people who are ending up in the hospital and who are losing their lives are those who are unvaccinated, which means that the vaccines are doing their job to keep people out of the hospital and to save lives.' 

After lagging vaccination rates over the summer, the pace has increased again with a seven-day rolling average of more than 889,00, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

That figure is 23 percent higher than the 718,000 average recorded one week earlier and the highest number seen since July 5.   

'My hope is that that will continue to accelerate because that is ultimately how we are going to save lives and overcome the Delta variant,' Murthy added.

Florida continues to be the country's epicenter with COVID-19 cases rising by 260 percent from an average of 10,452 four weeks ago to 37,685 on August 22, a DailyMail.com analysis found.

On Sunday, data from the U.S. Department of Human and Health Services revealed that 17,253 COVID-19 patients were hospitalized for COVID-19 in the state.

Currently, one in every five patients hospitalized with the virus in the country are in the Sunshine State. 

The crisis has pushed doctors to their breaking point and led to dozens of doctors in Palm Beach County holding a demonstration on Monday morning and urging residents to get vaccinated. 

'A large majority of hospitalized COVID patients are unvaccinated. This is not only upsetting but it is so frustrating to all of us who are here today,' Dr Jennifer Buczyner, a neurologist and stroke director at the Jupiter Medical Center, told a crowd. 

'Many of these patients have decided not to get vaccinated, but when they're vaccinated, they tell us they wish they had.' 

'We are all here behind me together, as your community doctors and hospitals, with one simple message that can save your life: Please go get vaccinated and wear a mask.'

COVID-19 cases have risen in Florida by 260% from an average of 10,452 four weeks ago to 37,685 on August 22

In Louisiana, COVID-19 cases have risen to 2,868 per day, a 186% increase from 1,000 per day in early July

New COVID-19 infections in Alabama have risen to an average of 4,303 per day on Sunday from 1,931 per day four weeks ago, a jump of 122% 

In Louisiana, the seven-day average of cases currently sits at 2,868 per day, a 186 percent increase from the 1,000 per day in early July.

Data from the Louisiana Department of Health shows that all but one of the state's nine health regions have 20 percent or fewer ICU beds available.

Gov John Bel Edwards recently said that Louisiana has seen an 'astronomical' number of new infections, particular among younger patients.  

The state has reported a 1,467 percent increase in COVID-19 deaths in residents under the age of 40.

'I can tell you that for the last couple of days, 28 percent of all the new cases that we're reporting are in children zero to 17,' he stated during a press conference. 

In Alabama, new infections have exploded to an average of 4,303 per day on Sunday from 1,931 per day four weeks ago, a jump of 122 percent.

'It's overwhelmed our staff and physicians,' Susan Boudreau, president of Mobile Infirmary hospital told AL.com.

According to Bourdreau, 41 percent of the 480 patients receiving treatment have COVID-19.  

'They see people suffering and dying. We don't feel the world understands what is happening behind our walls and hospitals,' she added.

And there's another worrying trend in the state - more pregnant women being admitted to the hospital infected with COVID-19.

Dr Akila Subramaniam, a maternal and fetal medicine specialist at the University of Alabama Birmingham hospital, said 39 pregnant women have been admitted so far this month of whom 10 are in the ICU and seven are on ventilators.

Normally, just one or two pregnant women would be in the ICU.  

'As physicians, we talk about who's a white cloud and who's a black cloud 0 meaning some people tend to have worse luck in terms of how things roll, and some people never seem to have any complicated patients on their service,' she told The Daily Beast.

'I tend to be more on the darker side of things, for whatever reason. And I've never had this many [patients] in the ICU at one time.'