The Dukes of Hazzard's John Schneider's studio hit by Hurricane Ida


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The Dukes of Hazzard's John Schneider has revealed that his production studio in Holden, Louisiana was left badly ravaged by Hurricane Ida.

The New York-born star, 61, who played Bo Duke on the show during its six-year run, took to Facebook to share an image of the damage on Monday, with the picture showing one of the General Lee cars from the show smashed by a fallen tree.

He penned: 'Well… When something like this happens you have two choices: Tears and laughter. I choose laughter. So… What’s your caption? Here’s mine: "Miss Ida stopped by to see the General at Miss Shirley’s last night…"'

The latest: The NY-born star, 61, who played Bo Duke on the show during its six-year run, took to Facebook to share an image of the damage on Monday, with the picture showing one of the General Lee cars from the show smashed by a fallen tree

Shock: The Dukes of Hazzard's John Schneider has revealed that his production studio in Holden, Louisiana was left badly ravaged by Hurricane Ida

Crushed: Schneider captioned the photo: 'Well… When something like this happens you have two choices: Tears and laughter. I choose laughter. So… What’s your caption? Here’s mine: "Miss Ida stopped by to see the General at Miss Shirley’s last night…"'

Schneider, who is also a country singer, was seen in a clip published by TMZ  Tuesday, in which he implored his fans to assist with the aftermath of the natural disaster by donating via his website .

The actor wrote: 'My request is that if you know somebody that's going through something like this, then you help them - go out and help them...

'If you don't, I'd very much like you to help us by going to the store - JohnSchneiderStudios.com... and I would very much appreciate it.'

He added: 'We are independent filmmakers, independent thinkers. And we're also free, and we're gonna get out of this.'  

Schneider, who appeared on Dancing with the Stars in 2018, said he was returning into town after spending time in Tennessee working on hurricane relief efforts. 

In a tweet shared on Monday, he penned: 'We are headed back and seem to be the only ones on the road. I’m get a real look at the damage to mom’s house in the morning and then head back to TN to continue flood relief...

'All people and pups are good. May have a "Hurricane Sale at Miss Shirley’s!" Soon!

Four people have died as result of the storm in Louisiana and Mississippi, according to the AP, which has left more than a million residences and businesses without power amid the severe weather conditions. 

The actor has kept fans updated on social media amid the tough time 

A million residences and businesses are without power amid the severe weather conditions of the hurricane. The devastation was seen Tuesday in Grand Isle, Louisiana

Country star: Schneider was snapped playing a concert in Nashville in 2018

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards said: 'We have a lot of work ahead of us and no one is under the illusion that this is going to be a short process.' 

The state has been described as a 'war zone' with residents scrambling for food, gas and water after satellite images began to reveal the extent of Hurricane Ida's trail of destruction through the state.

With the power off, people are struggling for relief from the sweltering heat as thousands of line workers toiled to restore electricity, and officials vowed to set up more sites where people could get free meals and cool off.

'It looks like a war zone or a bomb went off throughout [St. John the Baptist] parish,' state Sen. Gary Smith said on Tuesday, speaking to The Advocate. 'There's no part that's unaffected.'

Before and after satellite images have revealed the extent of the damage and flooding that Hurricane Ida has left in its wake in Louisiana.

With 150-mile-per-hour winds, Ida was the fifth-strongest hurricane to ever make landfall in the U.S when it barreled across the South on Sunday night.

The Category 4 storm has caused an estimated $80 billion in damage and sparked fears of a national fuel shortage after gas refineries were forced to suspend operations.

The storm - which has now been downgraded to a tropical depression - is now slowly makes its way northeast, sparking flood watches from Tennessee to New York.

But in its wake, residents in Louisiana are left to pick through the destruction amid a sweltering aftermath.

The before and after images show entire neighborhoods still submerged by floodwaters on Tuesday, nearly two days after the storm had made landfall in the area.

The recovery effort is just beginning in Louisiana after the storm barreled through the state, and officials have asked residents who evacuated to stay away for now  

Flood and wind damage was widespread in southeast Louisana (pictured) where Ida made landfall on Sunday evening