Fans sue studio for £3.6million after Ana de Armas was cut from ‘Yesterday’


Fans sue studio for £3.6million after Ana de Armas was cut from ‘Yesterday’
Ana de Armas in the film 'Yesterday'. CREDIT: Landmark Media/Alamy

Two Ana de Armas fans are suing Universal for $5million (£3.6million) after the actor’s scenes were cut from Yesterday.

Danny Boyle’s 2019 film imagined a world where everyone has forgotten about The Beatles except for one struggling musician.

Originally de Armas was set to play the love interest of protagonist Jack Malik (Himesh Patel) but her parts were cut for time, and she didn’t feature in the final cut of the film at all. However, she was still featured in the trailer in a scene alongside James Corden. This led two fans to rent Yesterday from Amazon in October 2021 for $3.99 (£2.95), specifically to see her.

They have now filed a class action lawsuit against Universal, accusing the studio of deceptive marketing. They are seeking $5million in damages.

“Because consumers were promised a movie with Ana de Armas by the trailer for Yesterday but did not receive a movie with any appearance of Ana de Armas at all, such consumers were not provided with any value for their rental or purchase,” the lawsuit states.

“Unable to rely on fame of the actors playing Jack Malik or Ellie (Lily James) to maximise ticket and movie sales and rentals, Defendant consequently used Ms. de Armas’ fame, radiance, and brilliance to promote the film by including her scenes in the movie trailers advertising Yesterday.”

According to Indiewire, Universal has declined to comment on the case.

Ana de Armas also starred in recent James Bond film No Time To Die as CIA Agent Paloma. However, according to writers Neal Purvis and Robert Wade, her original role was much smaller.

“There’s no denying that what goes down very well with an audience is the whole Paloma sequence,” Purvis said of the scene in which de Armas joins Daniel Craig’s Bond for a shootout in Cuba.

“We had Paloma in our script, but she was just a contact,” the writer went on. “Cary [Joji Fukunaga, director] wanted more, so one assumes that’s an area that Phoebe [Waller-Bridge, co-writer] dealt with.”